DYI

Do It Yourself Drywall Patch and Repair!!
Depending on the size of the job, you can save yourself some money with a “do it yourself” You will spend less money and gain a very valuable skill at the same time.

Drywall that is completely rotted from top to bottom will have to be totally replaced. However, small repairs can be made by cutting out and replacing. There are basically two primaries patching methods; the first involves cutting out the damaged area and extending the cut to reach studs on either side of the hole, then replacing the piece. The second is less precise but will save you time. It is used by experienced contractors who have the knowledge to “cut corners”

How-To

Complements of A Patch to Match.

This “how – to” will explain the first of the two methods. It is a little more time consuming, but having the knowledge of the more tedious method will only improve your work when you are able to use the second.

The Tools

Before detailing the "how - to", there is a list of supplies you will need to make your DIY drywall patch a success.

Level
Pencil
Utility Knife
Stud Finder
Drywall
Drywall Screws
Drywall Tape
Power Drill
Drywall Compound
Measuring Tape
Drywall Knife
Drywall Trough
Primer
Paint
Texturing tools (if needed)

Step One: MEASURING THE PIECE TO BE CUT OUT.

Determine the extent of the damaged drywall and mark around it lightly with a pencil so you know its basic shape. Find the studs on either side of the damage. You will need an exposed stud on either side of the damage to rehang the patch. Once you fine the studs, mark them on both sides. Using your level and a pencil draw out a square or rectangle that extends fully around the damage and reaches from stud to stud at the centers.

Step Two: REMOVING THE DAMAGES DRYWALL.

Now that you have accurately marked the damage, trace the line several times with a utility knife; continue to go over till the blade penetrates the drywall. DO NOT “dig” the utility blade in to deep, there may be wiring behind the drywall and you don’t want to damage this. When the damage has been traced fully use your drywall knife as a wedge to pry the damaged piece off.

Step Three: MEASURE AND CUT REPLACEMENT DRYWALL.

For precise an accurate cut, use a measuring tape to measure for the exact size of the hole. ALWAYS double check your measurement. Again, taking your pencil draw the outline of the needed shape. Use your utility knife the same way you did to remove the damaged piece to cut this new piece. Test by fitting the new piece into the cut out. Remeasure as needed.

Step Four: HANGING THE REPLACEMENT PIECE.

Keeping in mind the location of the studs before you rehang, set the replacement in the wall. Using drywall screws affix this new piece to the studs. Screws should be placed 6 to 8 inches along visible stud.

Step Five: TAPE AND MUD.

Open up the drywall compound, placing some in the trough. With a 4-inch drywall knife, apply the mud along the four seams around the replacement, smearing and pressing into the creases. Placing a piece of drywall tape the same length of the seam press firmly against the tape with the knife. Do this several times and follow up with the same process for the other three seams.

Step Six: SECOND AND THIRD LAYERS.

After your first layer of mud has dried, go over again with time with a wider knife. The goal is to cover the tape. Even though this will not be the final layer. After this second layer dries go over again with an even wider knife. At this time you completely cover any evidence of tape. You will also want to smooth the mud so it matches the rest of the wall at this time.

Once this third pass is complete you can add texture to the wall if needed. Follow up with a layer of primer and then paint last. NOTE: if you apply paint directly to the mud the mud will absorb a lot of the hue and make of an odd color.